NaviGRANT Reports
Name Description
Grant Search Find list of grants searching by key criteria
Grant Summary Find grant award amount summaries by market basket and timeframe
Organization Snapshot Snapshot of Organization Grants by Time Period
Market Basket Summary Award trends by year and top institutions for market baskets
New Award Trends Summary Snapshot of recently awarded grants trends

News and Updates
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3/31/2017
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Disclaimer: We are not responsible for any financial loss, data loss, downgrade in search engine rankings, missed customers, undeliverable email or an...

Now Available: Online NIH PROCUREMENT DATABASE
We also provide market research information through a historical NIH Procurement database. This is a online, searchable database, updated quarterly, that you can access through the NaviGrant website. The NIH Procurement database is particularly useful in determining marketshare, gaining competitive pricing intel and generating leads. This database includes a record of every transaction made at all NIH accounts, and includes both NIH Central Procurement and NIH VISA card orders. The information includes end user name, email address, physical address, phone number, building and room, item description, vendor, and price. So you can get the exact price paid for every product at the NIH. We offer this product as both a yearly subscription and user defined customized searches. For pricing information and to get a sample search, contact: Peter.Korolkoff@nihsales.com
1/21/2016
Now Available: Online NIH PROCUREMENT DATABASE (1/21/2016)

We also provide market research information through a historical NIH Procurement database. This is a online, searchable database, updated quarterly, t...

Now Available: EUROPEAN NEW GRANT AWARD SEARCHING SERVICE
Our European New Grant Award database is populated quarterly with new scientific grants from the following sources: CORDIS - Community Research & Development Information Service BBSRC - Biotechnology & Biological Sciences Research Council (UK) DFG - German Research Foundation ERC - European Research Council MRC - Medical Research Council (UK) Using your list of search terms (unlimited) we will search our database every quarter and deliver to you all matching grants, including full abstract, all customer contact information including email, physical address and phone number, dollar amount of grant, start date, end date, etc., in MS Word and MS Excel formats. Contact us for more information at peter.korolkoff@nihsales.com
1/20/2016
Now Available: EUROPEAN NEW GRANT AWARD SEARCHING SERVICE (1/20/2016)

Our European New Grant Award database is populated quarterly with new scientific grants from the following sources: CORDIS - Community Research & Deve...

Now Available: CHINESE NEW GRANT AWARD SEARCHING SERVICE
Our Chinese New Grant Award database is populated quarterly with new scientific grants from the following sources: NSFC National Science Foundation of China and 2 Regional Funding Sources - Beijing, Zhejiang. The database is written in both English and Mandarin. Using your list of search terms (unlimited) we will search our database and deliver to you all matching grants, including all customer contact information including email, physical address and phone number, dollar amount of grant, start date, end date, etc., in MS Excel formats. Contact us for more information at peter.korolkoff@nihsales.com
1/19/2016
Now Available: CHINESE NEW GRANT AWARD SEARCHING SERVICE (1/19/2016)

Our Chinese New Grant Award database is populated quarterly with new scientific grants from the following sources: NSFC National Science Foundation of...

FUNDING NEWS: NHGRI Pledges $280M to Support Genomic Research on Common, Rare Diseases
The National Institutes of Health today announced that the National Human Genome Research Institute will provide $280 million over four years to fund the creation of a network of genome sequencing and analysis centers to research the genomic basis of common diseases, as well as to support ongoing research into rare diseases. The agency also said it will provide $4 million to fund a coordinating center for its Genome Sequencing Program. "Advances in DNA sequencing are creating tremendous new opportunities for exploring how the genome plays a role in human disease," NHGRI Director Eric Green said in a statement. "Our continued focus on both rare and common diseases promises to reveal important aspects about the genomic architecture of a wide range of human disorders." Under the first initiative, the NHGRI has established the Centers for Common Disease Genomics (CCDG), which will use sequencing to examine the genetic bases of common diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, stroke, and autism. Institutes participating in the CCDG include Washington University, which will receive $60 million; the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, which will receive $80 million; Baylor College of Medicine, which will receive $60 million; and the New York Genome Center, which will receive $40 million. The CCGD members will initially focus on cardiovascular/metabolic and neuropsychiatric diseases, and may later expand into other disorders including inflammatory/autoimmune disorders, bone/skeletal diseases, and Alzheimer’s disease. In a conference call with reporters, Green stressed the importance of being able to discern genetic factors from environmental factors when studying disease. To address this challenge, the CCDG institutes will seek to sequence 150,000 to 200,000 genomes, including disease cases and controls. "The center investigators plan to use genome sequencing to identify as many of the genes and genomic variants underlying common diseases as possible," Adam Felsenfeld, director of the NHGRI Genome Sequencing Program, said in the NIH statement. "Building on existing research, they will continue to uncover new biological insights into the development of common disease. At the same time, these studies will reveal genomic variants that may increase the risk for — or in some cases, protect against — diseases, which eventually might be helpful for their clinical management." On the call, Felsenfeld also praised the work these institutions have already done. They all have a "very productive history" and have undertaken many studies on the genomic basis of disease, he said. They also have "excellent track records of lowering [sequencing] costs and producing high quality data, and excellent histories of intellectual contributions to tackle these problems," he added. The NHGRI has also awarded a new round of grants through its Centers for Mendelian Genomics (CMG), which was established by the agency in 2011 to investigate the genomics of rare, often hereditary conditions such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. Recipients of the new awards include the Broad Institute, which will receive $13.4 million, and Yale University, which will receive $12 million. Researchers from the University of Washington, Seattle and the Baylor College of Medicine will collaborate under the CMG initiative and receive $12 million, while collaborators from Johns Hopkins University and the Baylor College of Medicine will receive $11.6 million to support their efforts. "Rare diseases provide an important window into the biology of both rare and common diseases,” Lu Wang, director of the CMG program, said in the statement. "CMG investigators will continue to apply genome sequencing and analysis to find genes that cause Mendelian diseases, with a focus on novel genes." In the conference call, Wang added that institutes in the CMG program have already sequenced about 20,000 exomes, implicating thousands of genes in different diseases, many of them novel. Importantly, Wang said, these institutions have also "innovated their discovery pipelines in order to incrase their success rate," and that the continuing mendelian diseases program will not only focus on finding as many novel genes as possible in the next four years, but will also seek to "improve discovery pipelines and disseminate tools the researchers have developed." The NHGRI has also named Rutgers University as a coordinating center of its Genome Sequencing Project. The agency will provide $4 million in funding to support the university's efforts to coordinate the activities of CCDG and CMG members and foster collaboration among them. The coordinating center will also be responsible for improving data availability and leading center data-analysis efforts, the NHGRI said. When asked why NHGRI has chosen now to start such a program, Green said the drop in sequencing costs in recent years has made such an endeavor "affordable." Technological advances in DNA sequencing "are inching us closer to the $1,000 genome threshold," he added, "and that makes studies that were once unimaginable because of their scale quite possible."
1/15/2016
FUNDING NEWS: NHGRI Pledges $280M to Support Genomic Research on Common, Rare Diseases (1/15/2016)

The National Institutes of Health today announced that the National Human Genome Research Institute will provide $280 million over four years to fund ...

FUNDING NEWS: Subscribe to Research Funding NHGRI Earmarks $38M in FY '17 to Fund New ENCODE Project Efforts
The National Human Genome Research Institute announced that it intends to award up to $38 million in grant funding in fiscal year 2017 to help expand the scope of its ENCODE Project, both in terms of functional genomic element data it generates and how it analyzes and disseminates those data. Specifically, the agency will soon begin accepting grant applications around five new initiatives designed to expand the program's catalog of functional elements; move toward a general understanding of the roles of these genomic elements in different contexts; develop strategies to apply the program's findings to disease; increase the number of researchers participating in the project; and develop and disseminate new analytical tools to improve the value of ENCODE data. ENCODE, shorthand for ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements, was launched in 2003 to identify all functional elements in the human genome and freely share the data with the scientific community in accessible and interpretable formats. Thus far, ENCODE collaborators have identified various putative functional elements — including genes, RNA transcripts, DNA-encoded regulatory elements, and regulatory elements acting at the RNA level — using a variety of genomic methods based on biochemical assays. As of late last year, the project has released approximately 3,500 experiments, each containing at least two replicates, examining approximately 300 human cell types, as well as roughly 1,000 experiments in more than 150 mouse cell types, according to the NHGRI. These data are also being integrated into an encyclopedia of candidate functional elements to facilitate the study of the roles of functional elements in disease and basic biological processes. Based on recommendations made during a workshop held in early 2015 to consider future directions for the ENCODE Project and areas where additional work is required, the NHGRI has now issued five new funding opportunities around research that will help the project meet new goals. Under the first, the NHGRI will award $15.5 million to $20 million in fiscal 2017 to fund between six and eight Mapping Centers that will create comprehensive catalogs of candidate functional elements in the human and mouse genomes in an expanded number of cell contexts compared to those studied to date in the ENCODE project. Of particular interest to the NHGRI are projects mapping transcribed regions, chromatin accessibility, histone marks, sites of DNA methylation, long-range chromatin interactions, and various relevant chromatin proteins. It is also seeking projects to map the binding sites of RNA binding proteins and sequence-specific transcription factors not previously studied in ENCODE in a small number of biological contexts so as to identify binding motifs.
1/14/2016
FUNDING NEWS: Subscribe to Research Funding NHGRI Earmarks $38M in FY '17 to Fund New ENCODE Project Efforts (1/14/2016)

The National Human Genome Research Institute announced that it intends to award up to $38 million in grant funding in fiscal year 2017 to help expand ...

Source Update: New Sources Added to NaviGrant
NaviGRANT was recently updated to now include new grants from the following sources: - US Department of Defense - Michael J. Fox Foundation - National MS Society - NJ Commission on Spinal Cord Research - V Foundation
10/2/2015
Source Update: New Sources Added to NaviGrant (10/2/2015)

NaviGRANT was recently updated to now include new grants from the following sources: - US Department of Defense - Michael J. Fox Foundation - National...

FUNDING NEWS House Votes in Favor of Bill Boosting NIH Funding
The US House of Representatives today overwhelmingly voted in favor of a bill that would increase funding to the National Institutes of Health by about $10 billion, help speed the development of new drugs, and advance precision medicine initiatives. Called the 21st Century Cures Act, the bill was passed by a vote of 344 to 77. It was introduced by Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich. and has 230 co-sponsors. The bill would boost NIH funding by about $10 billion over a five-year period beginning in fiscal 2016 when the agency would receive $31.81 billion under the bill, compared to the $31.3 billion proposed by President Obama in his budget request. Additionally, the legislation would create an NIH Innovation Fund, funded at $2 billion each year for FY 2016 through FY 2020 for basic, translational, and clinical research. It also seeks to broadly define the roles of the US Department of Health and Human Services Secretary and the US Food and Drug Administration to advance precision medicine. The secretary would be required to provide and update guidance and information to assist those practicing precision medicine. The bill will next go to the US Senate and, if passed there, to President Barack Obama for approval. While the White House has said it is committed to increase support of biomedical research, earlier this week it released a statement expressing concern about increasing NIH funding without addressing budget sequestration. The statement also warns that the new responsibilities for FDA in the 21st Century Cures Act would exceed the resources allocated to the agency, preventing it from fully implementing programs outlined in the bill.
7/10/2015
FUNDING NEWS House Votes in Favor of Bill Boosting NIH Funding (7/10/2015)

The US House of Representatives today overwhelmingly voted in favor of a bill that would increase funding to the National Institutes of Health by abou...

Source Update : New Sources Added to NaviGrant
NaviGrant was recently upgraded to now include grants from the following private sources: JDRF - Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation AFAR - American Foundation for Age Research GENCAN - Genome Canada HHWF - Helen Hay Whitney Foundation MDA - Muscular Dystrophy Association MDSCRC - MD Stem Cell Research Commission SKFCR - Sidney Kimmel Fdn for Cancer Research SSP-Searle Scholars Program
1/21/2015
Source Update : New Sources Added to NaviGrant (1/21/2015)

NaviGrant was recently upgraded to now include grants from the following private sources: JDRF - Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation AFAR - American...


NaviGRANT Stats
Total Grants1,323,857
Current Grants173,368
Total Awarded for Current Grants$93.4 billion
Added in Last 30 Days11,226
Total Sources101